By Ian Mitchell and Nick Garrod, IBM, UK 

CICS TS V5.1 became available at the end of 2012, followed by CICS TS V5.2 in mid 2014. So what does that mean for you? Perhaps you can reduce operational complexity by hosting modern application interface logic inside the Liberty profile server within CICS? Perhaps you can use the new CICS Cloud capabilities to improve application reliability and accelerate deployments? Maybe you can improve your integration with Mobile devices? Or better control your costs though policies and consolidation? Nick and Ian open the CICS track to help you find out how CICS is reinventing mainframe application serving one again. Discover which sessions you should attend to get the most value from your attendance.

 

Ian J Mitchell is an IBM Distinguished Engineer at the Hursley Development Lab. He's spent over 20 years working on CICS and is currently the Architect for CICS Product Portfolio. He regularly presents sessions at SHARE, the Transaction and Messaging Conferences and for regional GUIDEs. Ian works with many of IBM's largest customers ensuring that CICS continues to provide the world leading capabilities and qualities of service it has been renowned for over 40 years.

Nick Garrod works in the Market Enablement for zAIM and spent many years supporting the CICS products in a variety of business and marketing roles.  He has been a member of the GSE Nordics steering committee for 10 years, and been a contributor to IBM Redbooks, IBM Systems journal, Enterprise Tech journal and Destination z.

By Ian Mitchell and Nick Garrod, IBM, UK

 

There is a lot going on behind that mysterious curtain. Recently, the CICS development organization has adopted a new practice called ‘IBM Design Thinking’, which will forever change the way CICS products are developed. The core principle of this approach is to make sure we get as much feedback as possible on our future ideas. This is a quite unique opportunity to participate in a discussion regarding the future of IBM CICS technology. We will be sharing our views. And we will be hoping for lots for interactive feedback. Please don’t be shy!

 

Ian J Mitchell is an IBM Distinguished Engineer at the Hursley Development Lab. He's spent over 20 years working on CICS and is currently the Architect for CICS Product Portfolio. He regularly presents sessions at SHARE, the Transaction and Messaging Conferences and for regional GUIDEs. Ian works with many of IBM's largest customers ensuring that CICS continues to provide the world leading capabilities and qualities of service it has been renowned for over 40 years.

Nick Garrod works in the Market Enablement for zAIM and spent many years supporting the CICS products in a variety of business and marketing roles.  He has been a member of the GSE Nordics steering committee for 10 years, and been a contributor to IBM Redbooks, IBM Systems journal, Enterprise Tech journal and Destination z.

By Matthew Webster, IBM, UK and Matthew Webster

Creating a CICS cloud can provide a step change in agility. Add DevOps to the equation and it’s more like a quantum leap. Imagine if the latest CICS DevOps technology could fully automate the reliable and repeatable deployment of CICS applications through the entire lifecycle. Imagine a fully automated build environment for any style of CICS application. With common scripting languages and tools to create a continuous deployment model. Or imagine using a tool like IBM UrbanCode Deploy to provision any type of CICS application, in coordination with other application and database components in a single action. Better still, don’t try and imagine it. Attend this session and see it for yourself.

Matthew Webster is an IBM Senior Technical Staff Member in the CICS® Transaction Server for z/OS® team, based in Hursley, UK. He holds a BSc in Physics with Computer Science from Southampton University, and has over 25 years of experience as a software engineer at IBM leading a wide range of projects from mainframe to open source. His areas of expertise include CICS, Java, Agile software development and Cloud technologies. Matthew is a regular blogger, podcaster and presenter with published articles and papers on CICS and software development.

By Isabel Arnold, IBM, DE 

Putting CICS into the cloud, is someone actually doing this? Since 2012 CICS TS Version 5 has been introducing and continuously enhancing its capabilities to support a Platform As A Service approach. Join speakers from CICS Technical Sales to hear about their experiences and how their customers gained value from cloud capabilities in CICS.

 

Isabel Arnold has been working as CICS Technical Sales Specialist since 2004. She started working in the field of Information Technology in 2001 and holds a German Diploma from University of Corporate Education Stuttgart. Her areas of expertise include CICS with focus on integration and modernization as well as modern application development for System z.

In her role she worked on three ITSO Redbooks and has been presenting at conferences like System z or WebSphere Technical Conference. Isabel teaches System z Software basics at German universities, is IBM representative for the German CICS user group and leads a team of CICS TechSales specialists across Europe.

By Ian Burnett, IBM UK

 

The CICS TS V5 releases introduce a number of runtime enhancements to reduce CPU usage, improve response times, reduce resource usage, while providing additional insight into transaction performance. Come along to this session as we explore some of the newer performance benefits found in CICS TS and how savings can translate to your environment. We will also look at a lab benchmark that consolidated CICS regions, maintaining throughput, saving significant MIPS, and reducing the management overhead.

 

Ian Burnett has lead the CICS TS for z/OS performance team for over five years, and has been involved with the performance testing of several releases of CICS TS during that time. In previous roles, Ian has been a developer on the CICSPlex System Manager and WebSphere MQ products, as well as testing the transaction and messaging components of WebSphere Application Server on both mainframe and distributed platforms.

By Matthew Webster, IBM,  UK

 

Deploying applications to CICS can be tricky, and you may be struggling to figure out how to handle the many new zFS artifacts such as cloud, bundles, Java, and web services. This could even be slowing down the adoption of new technologies that could deliver the solutions your business needs. This session will introduce IBM UrbanCode Deploy as a tool to automate many types of application deployments through your environments. It can provide rapid feedback and continuous delivery in agile development while providing the audit trails, versioning and approvals needed in production. See the new z/OS and CICS TS plug-ins for UrbanCode Deploy in action to deploy COBOL, web services, and Java applications to CICS in a single action.

 

Matthew Webster is an IBM Senior Technical Staff Member in the CICS® Transaction Server for z/OS® team, based in Hursley, UK. He holds a BSc in Physics with Computer Science from Southampton University, and has over 25 years of experience as a software engineer at IBM leading a wide range of projects from mainframe to open source. His areas of expertise include CICS, Java, Agile software development and Cloud technologies. Matthew is a regular blogger, podcaster and presenter with published articles and papers on CICS and software development.

By Matthew Webster, IBM, UK

 

So what does creating a CICS ‘Cloud’ really mean? And what exactly are these new CICS Cloud capabilities? How do these new Applications and Platforms artifacts relate to existing CICS technologies such as programs, transactions and regions? Where do these new Policies fit in? And most importantly, why would you do any of this? What value can you expect to derive from creating a CICS Cloud architecture?  If you have ever asked yourself any of those questions, this session will give you five compelling answers. If you ever wondered what the CICS Cloud means in the real world, this session if for you.

 

Matthew Webster is an IBM Senior Technical Staff Member in the CICS® Transaction Server for z/OS® team, based in Hursley, UK. He holds a BSc in Physics with Computer Science from Southampton University, and has over 25 years of experience as a software engineer at IBM leading a wide range of projects from mainframe to open source. His areas of expertise include CICS, Java, Agile software development and Cloud technologies. Matthew is a regular blogger, podcaster and presenter with published articles and papers on CICS and software development.

By Dan Millwood, IBM, UK

According to IDC, in 2013 “the worldwide smartphone market reached yet another milestone, having shipped one billion units in a single year for the first time”. This was an increase of almost 40% over 2012. If much of your business runs on CICS, you have probably already exposed at least some your CICS applications to the mobile world. But are you exposing these services in the optimal way for your company? Come to this session to discover what the supported options are for mobile exploitation in CICS Transaction Server, CICS Transaction Gateway and z/OS Connect. This session will compare and contrast the options available, so you can understand what is right for you.   Russ Teubner from HostBridge Technology will also give an ISVs perspective on CICS modernization, and will describe some new ways of integrating with CICS such as Server-Side JavaScript and Redis.  Make sure your phone is on silent – you won’t want to be disturbed in this session.

Daniel Millwood joined IBM in 1995, working as a developer for IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS and the messaging components of IBM WebSphere Application Server. He joined the CICS TS team in 2007, initially to lead a cross-product integration test team, testing CICS TS web services interoperability. Later, he joined the CICS TS development team, where he led the development of the CICS TS Feature Pack for Modern Batch, and helped develop the CICS TS cloud capabilities in CICS TS V5.1 and V5.2.

By Ian Burnett, IBM, UK

 

After giving sessions about Java in the past few years that tell system programmers they should do Java on IBM z Systems and that Java is just like every other language, this session tries to explain why Java is a bit different in operating and handling. We will compare COBOL/PLI/Assembler with Java and provide insight into how the Java technology works on z Systems. Come along if you want to find out the answers to questions such as: Why can't you phase in a Java program?  What does the JIT compiler do and how does it work? What is the development process of Java applications? How do I debugging and logging in Java applications?

 

Ian Burnett has lead the CICS TS for z/OS performance team for over five years, and has been involved with the performance testing of several releases of CICS TS during that time. In previous roles, Ian has been a developer on the CICSPlex System Manager and WebSphere MQ products, as well as testing the transaction and messaging components of WebSphere Application Server on both mainframe and distributed platforms.

By Michael Jones, IBM, UK

 “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité” (Liberty, Equality, Fraternity), is the slogan of France, coined around the time of the French Revolution. It also seems a pretty appropriate slogan for the mini revolution that is happening right now with CICS and WebSphere. The Liberty profile is a highly composable and dynamic application server runtime environment that is shipped as a part of both WebSphere and CICS. This session will introduce Liberty in CICS, compare the capability with WebSphere (note the ‘equality’ word) and discuss how these new Liberty applications can interact with and support the established fraternity of existing CICS applications that run your core business.

 

Michael Jones joined IBM in 2010, working as a build engineer for CICS Transaction Gateway. Starting with the CICS TS team in 2011 his Java heavy background led him to joining the test effort for the CICS Liberty team where he led the testing effort for Liberty in CICS TS 5.1 and CICS TS 5.2.

By Dan Millwood, IBM, UK

 

The business driver behind adopting a DevOps approach to developing software, is the need to deliver applications to the market faster, with lower costs and higher quality.  With CICS Transaction Server providing the core services on which many of these applications rely, the importance of being able to connect to CICS and reuse these core services continues to increase.   When CICS introduced native Web services about a decade ago, SOA became a reality for CICS customers. Today, many customers are doing tens of millions of SOAP based CICS Web services per day. Some are doing much more. But SOAP based CICS Web services are only a part of the CICS connectivity story. Support for the REST architectural style in CICS is an increasingly popular alternative to SOAP. And JSON is a popular alternative to XML for many application use cases. In this session, we will explore the different CICS connectivity options, suggest use-cases in which they can be of most value, and most importantly, learn which is the right tool for the job.

 

Daniel Millwood joined IBM in 1995, working as a developer for IBM WebSphere MQ for z/OS and the messaging components of IBM WebSphere Application Server. He joined the CICS TS team in 2007, initially to lead a cross-product integration test team, testing CICS TS web services interoperability. Later, he joined the CICS TS development team, where he led the development of the CICS TS Feature Pack for Modern Batch, and helped develop the CICS TS cloud capabilities in CICS TS V5.1 and V5.2.